IVF is it painful?

Home Forums Chat Room IVF is it painful?

This topic contains 13 replies, has 14 voices, and was last updated by Apple Apple 1 year, 10 months ago.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #352
    Molly
    Molly
    Participant

    IVF is a technique in which egg cells are fertilised by sperm outside the woman’s womb, in vitro. IVF is a major treatment in infertility when other methods of assisted reproductive technology have failed. The process involves hormonally controlling the ovulatory process, removing ova (eggs) from the woman’s ovaries and letting sperm fertilise them in a fluid medium. The fertilised egg (zygote) is then transferred to the patient’s uterus with the intent to establish a successful pregnancy.is it a very painful process? how many injections do we get in the whole process. or should i go for adoption directly . what is the sucess rate? what are the pros and cons? please tell me your experience. i am really scared of injection

    #353
    Alice
    Alice
    Participant

    It’s more painful emotionally than physically. There can be a lot of stressed involved and if you are not successful it can be heartbreaking considering everything you have been through. I have done 3 IVF cycles. I have not had a successful pregnancy but that is because of my age and other factors. The success rate varies from person to person. Older women have more difficulties, some clinics have higher success rates, immune factors can play a part. The injections are not bad at all! I was so scared at first but the needles are tiny and you just feel a little prick. Getting your blood drawn is far worse! The number of injections you give depend on many factors, including how you respond to them. Some women do one injection per day and some do one in the am and one in the pm. The worst injections are the butt shots. The needle is bigger. These do not start until you have had your embryos put back in. But, these injections are not bad either. My husband gave them to me and the first time he did it I thought that the needle didn’t even go in. The first thing I said when he injected the needle was “That was it?!” Some women ice or use a numbing cream to help but I never to. So, don’t be scared!

    #356
    Kate
    Kate
    Participant

    Every case is different, depending on your needs as to why you would undergo IVF as to how many injections you would need, they are different options for at least one drug I knew as I had an option of doing one by injection or by nasal spray (Of course I went nasal spray lol) as I had to have daily injections anyway, they dont hurt bugger all, it really is mind over matter, you’re so worried about it it will make it seem worse then it really is. As for the Egg retrieval, yes it can be painful afterwards, but if you look at the big picture as to what you are trying for, it will be worth it and tip after egg retrievaI -DRINK LOTS OF WATER to help recovery process, I would definitely have to say give it a go to try for your own child if you can, I personally am glad I went through IVF/ICSI for the experience, It give me a greater sense of respect and gratitude for having children, I wouldn’t have if it wasn’t for that.

    #357
    Milka
    Milka
    Participant

    IVF procedure. Egg collection . This is usually performed in the morning or early afternoon, approximately 36 hours after the hCG injection. Some clinics allow the male partner to attend the egg collection procedure if their wives have the operation under sedation. A monitor connected to the microscope will allow you to view the eggs when collected.
    Methods of egg collection.Several methods can be employed to collect the eggs, these include:
    Vaginal ultrasound guided egg collection. This is the most common technique; it is a minor and safe surgical procedure usually performed under sedation or a general anesthetic. Sedation is a safe and ecceptable method of providing pain relief for egg collection.
    A vaginal ultrasound probe with a fine hollow needle attached to it, is inserted into the vagina. Under ultrasound guidance, the needle is then advanced from the vaginal wall into the ovary to suck out the fluid from the follicle which contains the egg. Each egg is removed in turn through the needle by a suction device. Follicle flushing is not associated with improvement in pregnancy rates or the number of eggs collected, but does increase the duration of the procedure and associated pains. The whole procedure takes about 20-30 minutes. You may experience some mild discomfort following the procedure, but this will be relieved with painkillers. Antibiotic is usually given to prevent infection.

    #379

    Eva
    Participant

    There are several potential sources of pain during an IVF cycle. One which I know starts before the actual egg retrieval. In preparation for the egg harvest, it is standard to take injectable medications to help develop the eggs. These are done with small needles and modern injection pen devices. Almost everyone dreads the first injection just out of fear about the unknown, but after the initial anxiety is over, most women report that the injection pain is nothing. The needles are tiny and go in fast and easy. Compare this to if you had diabetes. In that case, you would be injecting yourself with similar needles many times a day.

    #380

    Claudia
    Participant

    Other potential source of pain comes as the eggs develop, when the ovaries start to enlarge, causing bloating. This is a very real phenomenon, and there’s little that can be done about it other than to limit the number of eggs that we grow. Of course, this is a tradeoff, because if you only have 4-5 eggs, the pain and bloating are minimal, but your success rate is going to be decreased. This is the part most women hate, but in reality, most women with a well-controlled stimulation don’t even experience any real pain, but merely significant bloating, which itself can be quite uncomfortable. This discomfort can extend well into the week after the egg retrieval.

    #389

    Leyla
    Participant

    One more source of potential pain comes on the day of the egg retrieval itself. Knowing full well that the eggs are removed by piercing a thin long needle through the walls of the vagina into the ovaries, many women anticipate great pain on that day. But in reality, the pain is zero during the procedure, thanks to the wonders of modern anesthesia.

    #419
    Monica
    Monica
    Participant

    Uh, yeah, it’s painful and anyone says that it’s not hasn’t done it. Even the doctors that reversed my husband’s vasectomy told me IVF would be painful if the reversal failed and we had to take that route! Most painful, water sonogram; this is where they pressure wash the inside of your cervix to rid of any growths. Next most painful, Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS); this is where you make more than 20-30 eggs (they got 36 from me!) and you have trouble eating, sleeping, sitting, breathing…just about everything for weeks. More pain, progesterone shots; should you conceive, you will do these for 3 months and, towards the end, the oil will not dissolve into your muscles and you will get painful humps on your lower back, which get more painful with each shot. Unnecessary pain, collapsed veins; this will occur when you have unskilled/bad nurses taking your blood and some that collapse your veins (My arm was white and numb for 2 days!). And lastly, the psychological pain that I experienced when I miscarried my twins and how they make you take blood tests to watch them die (More pain = $50 per test). Egg retrieval day isn’t pain-free either; However, the woman next to me wasn’t in any pain or so she said. The average person needs 2 fresh cycle tries and that’s what I had—I’m now pregnant. Is it expensive? Only if you think all this wasn’t worth the 40+K we spent to have this 1 baby. Best advice—research, research, research. The first clinic I found I chose due to word of mouth and they were horrible. The second was SIRM and I got pregnant there on the first try and it was a much more pleasant experience. I will be going back there for more IVF after I’m done breastfeeding this one. Hope this helps!

    #504
    Bridget
    Bridget
    Participant

    I just finished my 1st round of IVF on Sunday. I am in the 2ww right now. I think to answer your question honestly it’s a little bit like when people tell you that child birth isn’t THAT bad. I think once it’s over it doesn’t seem so bad. It’s more the fear of the unknown that it terrifying. In my drug plan most of the shots were pretty easy. I even ended up giving them myself after a few days. The hip injections have to go a bit deeper and are harder to give yourself because of location so my DH did those and continues to do the PIO shot until we find out if we are pregnant. It is not fun but it is not horrible either. Other than the shots, there is the egg retrival and in my REs office they put you completely under…some don’t…so ask about that. I didn’t feel a thing but never having had any kind of surgery this REALLY scared me. It was no big deal. I never even had to take a tylenol with codene and my left ovary was really hard to get to.

    #679

    Daria
    Participant

    The hardest part for me then was that people engaged in this procedure could not give any answer, what happens to my body, and only two months later was finally diagnosed. You do not think, I do not want to blame anyone. Of course, it is clear: everyone does their part, we are all human and no one is immune from mistakes. But what is the man who gives himself at the disposal of doctors, entrusts in their hands my life, my destiny ?! I would like to refer to a small but very important request to all health workers, directly related to the implementation of the ECO. Please organize psychological assistance to women who have undergone through this whole process and learn about the negative result. Do this for free, because you probably know that we have come to you, and so spent a lot of energy, health and money. Many of us have amassed more than a year in the hope that the last chance to bring good luck. Listen to the man who was destined to go through all this.

    #712
    Ana
    Ana
    Participant

    well i do not want to scare you but yes it is very painful. but i think that the result is definitely worth it. i have tried mini ivf and i can tell you something about it. according to this method you get a daily pill for 10 to 12 days that contains a low dose of the fertility drug Clomid. this drug stimulates ovulation by blocking the estrogen receptors at the hypothalamus, which is known as an important “hormonal control center” for the body. women who opt for a conventional IVF treatment are often exposed to high doses of anti-estrogen drugs that could cause ovarian hyper-stimulation syndrome .

    #775

    Donna
    Participant

    Transfer of the embryo in the uterus in 2-5 days after fertilization. The procedure does not require anesthesia (anesthesia) and performed on the gynecological chair for a few minutes. The embryo is transferred into the uterus through the cervix holding a special flexible catheter. the uterine cavity is not recommended to carry more than 4 embryos to avoid multiple pregnancies. The modern practice of IVF in Russia is such that usually carry out the transfer of two embryos.
    At impossibility of gestation patient can resort to the use of a surrogate mother.

    #784
    Mila
    Mila
    Participant

    well i have heard a lot abut them but i have not undergone them. i know that mini ifv has become very popular during the last few years. the basic concept is to do in vitro fertilization after a low level of ovarian stimulation with oral medications (possibly with some “low dose” injectables as well).this is in contrast to the usual method of ovarian stimulation for IVF which involves more aggressive stimulation of the ovaries with multiple injections over about 8 to 15 days.the standard method of stimulating is done in order to try to get about 10 or more eggs to work with for in vitro fertilization. the success rates for standard IVF are much higher that is everything what i know about such kinds of treatments. i hope that everything would be alright.

    #851
    Apple
    Apple
    Participant

    The process involves hormonally controlling the ovulatory process, removing ova (eggs) from the woman’s ovaries and letting sperm fertilise them in a fluid medium.
    The fertilised egg (zygote) is then transferred to the patient’s uterus with the intent to establish a successful pregnancy.is it a very painful process? how many injections do we get in the whole process. or should i go for adoption directly . what is the sucess rate? what are the pros and cons? please tell me your experience. i am really scared of injection.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.