What is it?

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This topic contains 22 replies, has 21 voices, and was last updated by Apple Apple 1 year, 10 months ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #401
    Monica
    Monica
    Participant

    The Empty Follicle Syndrome (EFS) is a frustrating condition in which no oocytes (eggs) are retrieved at IVF, even though ultrasound and estradiol measurements showed the presence of many potential follicles.The mechanism responsible for EFS remains obscure. Many hypotheses have been put forward, but none truly explain this syndrome. The most likely cause of EFS is ovarian ageing, as many patients who suffer from EFS are also poor responders.If an EFS cycle does occur during your treatment, please make sure you discuss it thoroughly with your gynaecologist and the clinic counsellor.EFS is an infrequent event and has been estimated to occur in between 2 – 7% of IVF cycles. However, the overall risk of recurrence in later IVF cycles is 20% and the risk of recurrence is higher as the age of the patient increases, with a risk of recurrence of <10% in patients <35 years, 24% for those between 35 and 39 years, and 57% for those over 40 years of age.

    #479
    Bridget
    Bridget
    Participant

    Empty follicle syndrome (EFS) has been defined as a condition in which no oocytes are retrieved from mature ovarian follicles with apparently normal follicular development and estradiol levels, after Controlled ovarian hyper stimulation (COH) for an assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycle, despite repeated aspiration and flushing. No oocytes are retrieved even after many ultrasounds & estradiol levels which show many potential follicles, Empty follicle syndrome is a frustrating situation at times.The risk factor for Empty follicle syndrome increases with age. About 24% of patients between the age of 35 to 39 years of age & 57% for those > 40 years of age.It has also 20% chances of recurrence & the risk of recurrence increases with advancing age of the patient.

    #615
    Sarah
    Sarah
    Participant

    Frequently, when following vigorous and often repeated flushing of follicles at egg retrieval they fail to yield eggs, it is ascribed to “Empty Follicle Syndrome.” This situation is most commonly seen in older women, women who have severely diminished ovarian reserve, and in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome. In my opinion it is often preventable when an optimal, individualized and strategic protocol. Ordinarily, normal eggs will readily detach and be captured with the very first attempt to empty a follicle. Eggs that have several chromosomal numerical abnormalities are often unable to facilitate this process. This explains why when the egg is complex aneuploid, its follicle will not yield an egg…and why, when it requires repeated flushing of a follicle to harvest an egg, it is highly suggestive of it being aneuploid and thus “incompetent”.

    #625
    Klara
    Klara
    Participant

    You know this is unexpected and uncommon; and many doctors are completely stumped as to what to do when this happens, because they have not dealt with this condition earlier. This is actually a medical emergency, but is often managed badly. Because many doctors don’t know how to deal with this problem, they tend to just continue with the procedure blindly, and suck out the follicular fluid from all the follicles. After completing the procedure, they then leave the theater.
    When the embryologist then reports that he cannot find any eggs, they tell the patient – Sorry, we did not get any eggs at all.

    #641

    Daria
    Participant

    I think that this is unexpected and uncommon; and many doctors are completely stumped as to what to do when this happens, because they have not dealt with this condition earlier. This is actually a medical emergency, but is often managed badly. Because many doctors don’t know how to deal with this problem, they tend to just continue with the procedure blindly, and suck out the follicular fluid from all the follicles. After completing the procedure, they then leave the theater. When the embryologist then reports that he cannot find any eggs, they tell the patient – Sorry, we did not get any eggs at all.

    #695
    Ana
    Ana
    Participant

    oh, i know a lot about it and i think that i may help you with this problem. first of all it is a condition in which no oocytes are retrieved from mature ovarian follicles with apparently normal follicular development and estradiol levels. no oocytes are retrieved even after many ultrasounds & estradiol levels which show many potential follicles, empty follicle syndrome is a frustrating situation at times. eFS do not predict a reduced fertility potential in future cycles. that is everything what i may tell you concerning this topic. i think that i have mentioned everything.

    #736

    Donna
    Participant

    The doctor starts puncturing the follicles, and is dismayed when the embryologist does not get any eggs whatsoever in the follicles.
    The procedure in the OR seems to be technically straightforward.
    The follicles collapse when aspirated and there is free flow of follicular fluid into the test tubes.
    However, when the embryologist scans the follicular fluid under his microscope, he does not find any eggs as all

    #823
    Apple
    Apple
    Participant

    I think that it has been more than a decade since the concept of empty follicle syndrome (EFS), in which no oocytes are retrieved in an IVF cycle, was introduced.
    EFS has been reported to occur in natural as well as stimulated cycles in which multiple follicles develop yet no oocytes are retrieved. The incidence of this syndrome in patients undergoing IVF has been estimated to be about 2–7% , although a more recent report suggests a lower incidence.

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